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20121201
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and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 split between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has rein
history tv on c-span3. >> china's emerging global power and maritime strategy were the focus of a panel discussion at the halifax international security forum. panelists discuss the territorial disputes involving japan in the east china sea, cybersecurity and international diplomacy. this is an hour, ten minutes. >> welcome back, everybody. this session for miscalculation, china and the rise of confusion or confucianism. i'd like to hand over to steve clemens who's moderating this session. .. >> thank you all for joining us. when i was thinking about the title today and thinking about our panel, it occurred to me, and i went online to find a chinese event that is being held right now looking at u.s. grand strategy, canada, japan and india. there are no canadian, japanese americans or canadians on china's panel. don't have any chinese with us today but we should have a lot of fun discussing that our national strategies but involving in the asian pacific region and with china but i want to acknowledge that that voice wasn't with us today. that might give us more room to run. because we do
'm with the world journal. could you address growing chinese assertiveness in south china sea and east china sea? and given china just announced they will intercept the ship's that go into territorial waters. so are you going to participate in upcoming defense talks with chinese? and what message do you want to tell them? thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course the issues that are being placed today in a south china sea and other areas in the north and central, east asia, i think are quite complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes, some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and that's i think to some degree has motivated some of the activities that you see, seeing there. the u.s. position as you know is that we don't take sides on territorial disputes. there's many of those around the globe, not just in the south china sea. but we do want them resolve peacefully, without coercion. and that we call on all the parties there, including the chinese, to ensure that as they approach these problems that they
.n. security resolutions. he also talked about china's decision to the aircraft carrier in the obama administration shifted À la terry resources for the pacific region. this is a half-hour. >> well, good morning and allow hot. i am glad to be here to talk to you about the pacific command, where we are today to where we see ourselves heading in the future. since the last time i was here, we continue to move forward on the rebalanced initiative after as directed by president obama. the rebalanced rows on the strengths of the entire u.s. government, including policy, diplomacy, trade and of course security and that the area i work in. for me, the rebalanced has been and continues to be the strength of the relationships, adjusting our military posture and presents and employ new capacities to ensure we continue to effectively and efficiently contribute to the stability of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interests. of course the keys to success of the innovative access agreement, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases come efficient force posture in yeste
.n. security council. it's likely china will try to water down those provisions but it's also certain that the provisions will pass. >> you don't think china will try to veto it? >> i don't think they will veto it. they don't want north korea doing this. >> china is the only ally that they really have. i wonder, do you think it's possible they didn't inform china in advance of the timing of this launch? >> it's possible they did not. people now suspect that the information that we had that north korea was moving its rocket, something was wrong with it, was it an intentional deceptive move? they thought there would be attempts to shoot it down. they wanted to fool japan. they succeeded. >> and it certainly does strengthen the new young leader kim jong-un domestically. >> absolutely. they have been trying since 1998 to launch a long-range missile and they failed in the previous four attempts. they succeeded in this. it's not a rocket that can deliver a major warhead. there are marriajor hurdles to >> they have done in north korea where a lot of people are starving what south korea has b
expensive to do business in countries like china. our workers have become even more productive. our energy costs are starting to go down here in the united states. and we still have the largest market. so when you factor in everything, it makes sense to invest here, in america. and that's one of the reasons why american manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace since the 1990s. and thanks in part to that boost in manufacturing, four years after the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes, our economy is growing again. our businesses have created more than 5.5 million new jobs over the past 33 months. so we're making progress. [applause] we're moving in the right direction. we're going forward. so what we need to do is simple. we need to keep going. we need to keep going forward. we should do everything we can to keep creating good middle- class jobs that help folks rebuild security for their families. [applause] and we should do everything we can to encourage companies like daimler to keep investing in american workers. and by the way, what we shouldn't do -- i just got to say this -- wh
invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courtesy we could possibly be accorded because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another "brothers." they acted that way in private. they served that way in the senate as chairman and vice-chairman and vice-chairman and chairman of the appropriations committee. they single-handedly shaped our american defense posture and they did it with skill and pay troivmen--and patriotism and the that very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan dan inouye was. he was of the old school. not a bad school for today, in my point of view. he treated each senator with
it -- and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue and -- in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 s plit between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8